Browsed by
Category: Stories

Susan Runs The Edges (prose)

Susan Runs The Edges (prose)

There’s a big difference between the world of Water Runners, Tree People, Plainsmen, Mountain Folk, Sea People, and The Flying Ones and our world.

On our world, all the humanoids have a common ancestry, an essentially identical physical makeup, and the ability to produce fertile offspring. That is to say, we are all the same species. And so while we may sometimes form identities and organizations based along racial lines, when different human populations smash together, we inevitably begin to desire each other and to mate and share children; and so soon enough, even without possessing enough wisdom to always innately see past superficials and into our core commonality, given enough time calm and freedom (within a given time/place/power-system), we inevitably fade into one another body, heart, mind and culture.

On Planet X, all the humanoids evolved from other animals. They don’t find each other particularly attractive (I mean, there’s always going to be somebody …), and they cannot produce fertile offspring (we know because, again, there’s always somebody). So their humanoid identity is not as fluid as ours.

However, on Planet X, all humanoids possess opposable thumbs (granted, the Air Ones’ thumbs are on their feet), and roughly human heads and limbs (OK: a shark-like tail replaces the Sea People’s legs, and their earless noseless grey-blue heads flow into their hulking forms so seamlessly that it is difficult to discern where head ends and neck begins or where neck ends and body begins; and the Air Ones have wings instead of arms; and the Plainsmen look more like antlerless elk than humans as they bound across the plains with long arms tucked along glistening torsos), and brains with the awareness and intellectual and emotional complexity to sense the Truth shining through everything and—given the right ideas, disciplines, and supports—to adequately translate spiritual insight into human words and deeds.

Divinity students can debate whether the opposable thumb pulled the brain into consciousness or consciousness pulled the various creatures along towards itself, using opposable thumbs and the tool-making, signaling, and hand-holding they make possible to enlarge minds and hearts. But whatever the ultimate origins, the fact remains that all humanoids on Planet X evolved opposable thumbs first, and spiritual awareness second. Despite their different physical family trees, all humanoids can, with a modicum of spiritual maturity, perceive their common spiritual origins, and so while the different species of Planet X humanoids have not, at least in the era where our story begins—roughly equivalent technologically and politically to the bulk of North America right before European arrivals—ever lived peaceably under a cross-species government; however, though they are as a group far from free of speciism, they don’t generally go so far as to claim either that other humanoids lack souls or that non-humanoid animals have individual souls akin to the eternally spiritually- and ethically-bound cores humanoids enjoy.

Personally, I’ve never been able to figure out exactly how much awareness, to take two widely separated examples, a dog or a pillbug have. It is hard to imagine that dogs don’t at least catch a little sense of the divine joy and eternal presence of the Soul Light. But what about pillbugs? Their sense of the holy must be quite tiny—musn’t it? Since they are almost like machines, having very little presence within their own desires and panics. But even supposing dogs own some sense of the holy, can a dog be wise?, can a dog grow spiritually to a degree warranting an individual soul? Some say when a human misbehaves, s/he’s reincarnated as a dog or, in extreme cases, a pillbug; and then s/he has to work back up to human form. But does this make practical sense? Compare the number of individual humans to individual animal lifes, and it seems that you soon run out of human-souls to fill all the animal bodies. So then some animals have animal souls or perhaps no individual soul (being only hulls around the One Soul), but some animals have doleful remorseful oh-so-penitent human souls?? Explaining, perhaps, the rare cockroach: one with more shame and ego than the average bug??? (I’m being facetious: this is not a phenomenon I’ve ever observed; although I grant you I’ve made little to no effort to discover spiritual differentiation within cockroaches.)

Given such considerations, I’m wont to cross out the whole idea of individual souls and replace it with a buddhisty notion of spiritual energies that perhaps continue after death, but that must eventually dissolve into the One Soul. No, I’m sorry, but I cannot see my way to a belief in individual souls—at least not eternal souls. Please don’t be alarmed by these metaphysical musings! If they happened to point adequately well towards Reality, that wouldn’t imply that the you who now exists will necessarily die upon death: maybe there’s reincarnation into other creature life and/or into spiritual beings until one finally flows into God; and while I cannot believe in or hope for the eternal continuance of any spiritual energy except God Light’s, everything that ever was could still remain as a memory of which God had awareness both from the outside (God’s infinite perspective encompassing all things) and the inside (God looking through from that being’s individual perspective, and so in some sense retaining its identity, although this is a little worrisome, because then wouldn’t all kinds of horrible states remain forever, not just in cases of complete spiritual disaster, but also infinite moments of everyday delusions and follies—wouldn’t those moments also have to hang forever in God’s two-sided memory??).

Fortunately, we humanoids are not required to riddle out eternal mysteries within our limited little lives. And so let us accept what is required for human joy and decency, and which anyway blares unambiguously through our ever conscious moment: we’re all in this together and must work to be ever more aware, clear, honest, kind, wise, good, joyfully together (true: you cannot define these goals perfectly in words; but words can still point our intellectual/emotional thinking towards an adequate sense of these goals, a sense that will grow as we get better and better at reaching said goals). Let us accept what we must know to win any traction in our own thoughts and feelings, and work to know/understand that knowledge better and better (by better and better organizing our ideas and feelings around the Light within that is both Reality and The Truth, and thus capable of sharing Certain Knowledge with one’s thought-as-a-whole, though naturally—owing to the mismatch between What Is and ideas and feelings about What Is—not perfectly/literally/definitively/1:1, but instead as insights that can, given enough awareness, clarity, honesty, and open-heart/mindedness, get better and better); let us not fret our small mortal noggins overmuch over details which we’ll not anyhow ever figure out, and which we could not really make much sense or use of even if we were somehow gifted with the “whole story”; no, let us stick to the basics: awareness, clarity, honesty, kindness, wisdom, goodness, joyful all-inclusive community.

Susan had told her parents she needed to go run the edges—to clear her thoughts, of late scattered and confused, as if she were a watermouse caught in an eddy, frantically and mindlessly panicking. Her father told her not to journey past her limits (second bend downriver [a little over a mile]; the advent of the tumble rapids upriver [a little less than a mile]); her mother told her not to be late for dinner (dinner always at sunset). They both told her to obey rules that she already knew about. She agreed to obey the rules she’d already planned on obeying and which you might argue they needn’t have mentioned, seeing as they were well established and faithfully followed, and slipped into the cool clear gently rippling river beneath their cabin door.

Susan chases the edges, like the elders had instructed.
Everything moved as one as she skates across the waters.
The river wide as a lake out here; far from town.
Susan’s town of bamboo rafts and shacks floats silent
in the rounded distance, at the edges of her eyes.
She follows slow-spreading green round a rocky bend.

A water skater, a river chaser, she-who-belongs.
How easy it is when you can!
Wide flapped froggy feet fold up down the center,
thin black legs stab into liquid glass, push against,
jam her spindly body the otherwise, setting up
a falling slice from that side’s folded flipper.

Nothing compares to water skating,
the concentration of never-hating.

On and on she flies, forgetting everything but
her motion, calm, the swoosh of her water strikes.
Deep inside, pushing out from within, searching
for the edges, to stay within yet go beyond,
to chase the edges, catch the light, know all joy.

The village out of sight when she unfolds her flipper feet
and skids to a spraying stop, standing breathless on wide
strange crinkling river flowing to a sea she’s never seen.
On the banks the Tree People gather timber in their way,
many on the lines and one flailing at the base;
two hatchets, steel glinting in passion’s blur.
A youth rests upon a rock, his short legs crossed.
She waves her thin webbed hand, he, long arm
thick as her torso, waves a broad flat hand.

Susan’s overcome by joy and fun
She’s able, she’s one
Who runs the river
That leads into the sea.
Focus on gratitude
on the wonder of running
with those who rule the rivers,
who travel to the sea.

At dinner Mama wonders what Susan’s seen and heard.
A squick-squick bird diving beneath the water
coming up empty-beaked.
The Tree People hunting timber.
Waterhoops rolling wild–she had to jump over them.
Mama tsks.
Father shakes his head.
When will the council address this matter?
The waterhoops are outgrabe!

BW/AMW

Ghost Story Night

Ghost Story Night

It was Last Sunday and the moon stood bright and wide.
Susan hugged her parents and walked across the smooth wood floor,
blankly registering the constant jiggling of the river flowing beneath.
She removed the thatch covering over a small hole in the center of their floating cabin and,
flippers slicing the cool rippling flow, slipped into the river, holding the cylindrical little door over her head and settling it neatly back in place after her splashing disappearance.

Her mother looked at her father and shook her head.
He threw his arms up, elbows at his side, webbed fingers supplicating the various forgotten gods.
“He’s your father.”
She winced. “He’s a wise man; I trust his goodness and his wisdom, but I am worried they are not enough.”
But, madam, if wisdom and goodness are not enough, what hope have we creatures? What compass is left us?? And so we must accept the only tools that could ever mean anything to us, that could ever do anything for us, take us anywhere that we could ever really care about, believe in, belong to.

Susan swam swiftly to the market square, deserted now except for a few kids playing checkers (the universe is a child playing checkers) and strange old Henry, who seems to spend all day and night sitting on the wooden railing, looking sadly into the center of the market square. Especially at night when no one’s there and all is muffled and lightless does his body slump dejectedly and his eyes glass with some deep internal shudder that he cannot move beyond. Strange fellow. Nice enough to talk to, though he never says much. She waited by the entry—a break in the railing wide enough to hold four or five Water Runners standing shoulder to shoulder (so about five feet wide)—nearest her grandparents’ home, dangling her legs in the water.

These Water Runners are funny folk.
At least they’re funny-looking.
They remind me of cormorants.
Have you ever seen cormorants?
They are sleek black water birds you’ll watch dive into water fresh, salt, and in-between.
Water Runners are likewise black, sleek, smooth divers.
And they also share the cormorants oily wet look.
Their skin is pure black and covered by tiny black hairs that collectively bear a striking resemblance to the oiled feathers of a cormorant.
But Water Runners are humanoids, not birds.
What a thin people! arms and legs like beanpoles.
Instead of visible noses, they’ve two small slits. Instead of ears, they’ve an invisible hole on either side of their head. You might think they were little kid bank robbers in black jumpsuits and ski-masks, but their proportions are too narrow for a human to pull off.
Flippered feet and webbed hands, small but deadly sharp claws on each digit.
Made for the water, they dive beneath the surface of a river or lake, swim and dart about from one submerged stone to another. Their big wasp eyes shielded by a thin retractable shield and using sonic clicks and hand signals to communicate, they scavenge, hunt, explore, play in the warbling underwater light. After quarter of an hour or so, they’ll surface, gorge themselves on air for a few minutes, and return to the well-lit depths of deep-channeled rivers and shallow lakes.

Water Runners don’t like water too deep to see in. They leave that to the Sea People, who can breathe water and see without light, and who are altogether more suited for such scary depths. Of course, the sea people don’t like freshwater, and so no human-like creature ventures beyond the shallows of the giant lakes with waves and storms like oceans. But that’s just as well.

The craggy, pocketed rocks jumbled on the water’s edge make for a sharp, bumpy, thoroughly unpleasant seat. Hence the little square reed mats. One or two are enough for the sleight Water Runners, but the Tree People need four or five beneath their solid rumps. Susan sat nearest the river. There one need only lean a little to one side to tumble down a few feet into the safety of quick-moving, white-foaming waters. The Tree People, being clumsy even in calm, easy waters, fear quickwater and would never pursue a Water Runner into the froth. Next to Susan percherd her grandfather; next to him his friend Sam, of the Tree People. Sam’s grandson Ted, about Susan’s age and friend her whole life but never playmate and never once physically touched by her, sat next to his grandfather, the escape vine between them.

In the old days, with the Water Runners and the Tree People constantly skirmishing, many such meeting places had been designated along the river’s edge. With the water near, the Water Runners could safely escape the Tree People, and with heavy trees overhead and vines and/or ropes dangling down to the rocks, the Tree People could easily toss themselves up into the canopy to evade belligerent Water Runners.

Susan’s grandfather had grown up as the fighting waned. Over the years delicate peace treaties grew stronger as the peoples webbed themselves deeper and deeper into each other, forming religious, business, and political relationships that in many cases blossomed into real but cautious friendships. Like the one between Maxwell Knifehider of the Water Runners and Samuel Strongarm of the Tree People. For years now they’d met on this pile of rugged boulders by the foaming spitting jagged waters and beneath the heavy limbs of ancient fern-leafed and soft, yellow-trunked trees.

Maxwell and Samuel were both religious leaders, ones who spoke to gods, healed the sick and wounded, advised the leaders, warriors, traders, and laborers in matters of the spirit. On this rocky outcrop, they shared ideas their respective peoples couldn’t, in their judgement, presently bear to hear: all the true gods were just different human experiences of the one God, who did and did not mind names like “River Driver” and “Great Sky Tree”. But those kind of radical theological musings were for evenings without grandchildren. Tonight they’d tell the old stories, the stories shared by all the peoples, the ones from the days of the creatures.

“It was the time of the creatures and the sky was sticky and mean. Every place had its monster: Tall spindlers roamed the plains; dread dogs bounded the forest floor and tree to tree; bigmouthed frogs sliced the waters, chomping Water Runners; laughing sharks scattered Sea People remnants across ocean floors; and from overhead great long-beaked fire-breathing birds burnt and tore everyone, although they paid particular attention to tumbling the Flying Ones’ cliff-side villages into the surging sea. Worst of all were the mountain monsters; that is why the Mountain People are to this day so few and so skittish you can never find one—not even at the edges, where in the First Days other peoples found and knew them. In the First Days, all peoples believed in one another and no one fought anyone. All had all they needed and anger filled no one. But then the creatures came, and the creatures tore up everything.”

“It was the time of the creatures, cruel and bold. Monsters without bellies, hungering only for mayhem, for spreading pain, destruction, death and loss. Tall spindlers were strange balls of rough loose rhino flesh, with leathery legs and arms as long swinging vines but thick like water poplars. They ran like thunder and lightning, tossing themselves across the world, their fierce-clawed spinning arms slicing every hut, every Plainsman, every ox and every cart. Nothing could stand their reckless sour-heartef fury; any Plainsman within reach would–strong, fast, and fierce as they are on the open grounds–be cut in two. There was no hope, no way to defeat the tall spindlers with slicing teeth and giant bulging yellow eyes. And who could stand against a dread dog as it banged from tree to tree, its sticky drooling teeth decapitating every Tree Person, hurting tree homes and walkways to the dirts far below? Nor was there a weapon to pierce the thick unctuous hide of the bigmouthed frogs, that swam faster than the fastest fish and lived only for destruction: chomping Water Runners apart, ramming their homes and boats until they sank; even their urine was a deadly poison that made the waters putrid, killing fish and Water Runner alike.”

“Those monsters were terrible. And the people suffered greatly. But the worst creatures from the time of the creatures were the laughing sharks who tore apart the twenty seas; the fire spitting birds who broke and burnt homes, trees, fields, anything safe and nourishing; and, worst of all, the mountain men because they were men like us and clever like us, but they were also evil giant monsters without stomachs or hearts, as tall as a riverside willow, covered in white, impenetrable fur, with red desperate eyes, strong enough to snap an ox’s neck in one hand and crumple the tallest proudest Plainsman in another.”

“Some say the mountain men led all creatures, that all haters obeyed their will, followed their command, fulfilled their plan. Some say the creatures are not dead, but only waiting; and the mountain men hold the few surviving Mountain Folk emaciated and blurry-brained in small prickly cages, saved for the dark day coming”

“For what day? What dark day?!” Blurted out young Theodore Treebreaker. Rising up on his two stubby legs, great arms reaching high with long shovel fingers drooping down, twittering. He reminds me of an excited orangutan. Of course, Tree People are bigger than orangutans, and though their arm and leg proportions are more orangutan than human, they otherwise look like bodybuilding humans covered from brown head to black toe in a very fine light grey fur. Also, all humanoids sport opposable thumbs, a handy tool of which neither ape nor monkey nor any other animal can boast.

“Awaiting the day of great vengeance. When the creatures return to end our world and send all living people to the distant land, where the dead dwell.”

“Why great vengeance? What have we done? Why do they want to hurt us?” asked Susan in a quiet voice, instinctively leaning towards the water,as if the cool skipping water could save her from the creatures in her head.

“If the creatures had reasons, they would be humans and the gods could reach them, could persuade them, guide them into gentler paths. They could repent their wanton violence and live joyfully, at peace with themselves and all living creatures. But they have no reasons. They are not like us who think: ‘I should find a justification for this act, and if I cannot, or if I discover that the justifications I am able to give are not adequate, I should cease committing the act’. Even the mountain men, who spoke and strategized, who outsmarted many peoples many times–they had no reasons. They did not ask themselves why they must kill and maim, break and tumble. They felt like hurting us; that was enough to drive their berserk, to punish us day and night. These creatures do not understand love, kindness, joy, friendship. They are soullessly miserable in a way that no person–no matter how lost to folly–can ever be. For we always have Godlight within, trying to get through to us, to lead us to better, more beautiful feelings, thoughts, words, deeds. But the creatures–that’s the real problem with the creatures. They have no soul, only sickness on the inside and strength on the outside.”

AMW/BW

Water Skaters

Water Skaters

Zini chases the edges, like the elders had instructed.
Everything moved as one as she slipped across the waters.
The river so wide as a lake out here, far from town.
Zini’s town of bamboo rafts and shacks floats silent
off in the rounded distance, at the edges of her eyes.
She follows slow-spreading green round a rocky bend.

A water skater, a river chaser, she-who-belongs.
How easy it is when you can!
Wide flapped froggy feet fold up down the center,
thin black legs stab into the wet, push against,
jam her spindly body the otherwise, setting up
a falling slice from that side’s folded flipper.

Nothing compares to water skating,
the concentration of never-hating.

On and on she flies, forgetting everything but
her motion, calm, the swoosh of her water strikes.
Deep inside, pushing out from within, searching
for the edges, to stay within yet go beyond,
to chase the edges, catch the light, know all joy.

The village out of sight when she unfolds her flipper feet
and skids to a spraying stop, standing breathless on wide
strange crinkling river flowing to a sea she’s never seen.
On the banks the wood people gather timber in their way,
many on the lines and one flailing at the base with
two hatchets, steel glinting in a blur of passion.
A youth rests upon a rock, his short legs crossed.
She waves her thin webbed hand, he, long arm already
as thick as her torso, waves a broad flat hand.

A strange people, strong, swift in the trees,
but slow and clumsy on ground and water.
Not unpleasant, but a bit dull, divided
as they are from the magic of the river.
And, though it’s undignified to dwell
upon such matters, rather unsightly:
covered in coarse orange-brown hairs
everywhere except on their big round faces.

But, of course, it isn’t their fault
that they’re neither beautiful nor fit
to run the rivers.
One should rather focus on gratitude
for the wonderful blessing of belonging
to those who rule the rivers,
who travel to the sea.

At dinner Mama wonders what Zini’s seen and heard.
A squick-squick bird diving beneath the water
coming up empty-beaked.
The wood people hunting timber.
Waterhoops rolling wild–she had to jump over them.
Mama tsks.
Father shakes his head.
When will the council address this matter?
The waterhoops are outgrabe!

AMW/BW

In der Bankschlange/In Line at the Bank

In der Bankschlange/In Line at the Bank

Wenn irgendeine überlastete, kleine, magere, matte, vom kalten Rauch riechenden Laufmädchen in einem unebenen grellgelben polyestern Rock und einem zu großen, verblassten, rosa, kurzärmligen, breitgekgragten Hemd mit riesigen plastischen Knöpfen ahnungslos und erschüttert zwinkert und mit schaumigen Speicheln umgegeben offenen Mund lautlos weint während eine große Dame mit massiven kullernden Brüsten und Gesäßbacken in einem schmeichelhaften Nadelstreifrockanzug, ihre lange dünne geschmückten Fingern auf einer niedrigen Marmor bedeckten Theken gespreizt, über die Wehrlose ragte, durch zusammengekniffene Augen, Nüstern, und langem Choralmund an ihr herabschaute, und in falschsüßer Altistin — die sie gelegentlich mit schrillen, abgehackten rachenraumgeborenen Schaulachen unterbricht — erklärte, daß die junge Dame am falschen Ort sei, daß man hier leider keine Zeit für derart geringfügige Konten, daß wenn Online ihre Bedürfnissen nicht entsprechen werden würde, sie eine andere Bank finden könnte, oder — was in diesem Fall fast sicherlich am praktischsten sei — einfach ein Paar Stunden im Betteln verbringen:
vielleicht eilte dann ein junger Praktikant eines gut angesehenen mittelständischen Kaufhauses aus seiner geschätzten Stelle in der langen, mehrmals sich überschlagenden Schlange und, Ledersohlen auf glitzerndem Marmor rutschend, hart an er schwarznussen Bankschalter stösste, das HALT! in großartiger Sicherheit riefe.

Da es aber nicht so ist; eine schöne Dame, die jugendliche Gesundheit aus vollen rosigen Wangen strahlend, ihr zierlicher, kurvenreicher, athletischer Körper freudig in enganliegenden rosa Pulli und schwarzen Hosen umhüllt, mit zurückgeneigtem Kopf in kindlicher Freude lacht während eine große Dame mit massiven kullernden Brüsten und Gesäßbacken in einem schmeichelhaften Nadelstreifrockanzug, ihre langen Fingern an ihren liebenswürdigen — und, wenn der riesige glitzernde Verlobungsring glaubwürdiger Zeuge ist, doch sehr geliebten — Hüften, mimt, indem sie von Seite zu Seite schlängelt und mit künstlich übertrieben hervortretenden Lippen die Hälse pfaut, eine freche Schelterin, entschuldigt sich nochmals und nochmals der Kleine versichert, daß falls sie nicht beim Bankautomaten nicht zurecht komme, Joe — an dem sie jetzt winkert und der, ein gut gelaunter Bär in einem gut anpassenden Anzug, mit einem breiten offenen Hand und einem freundlichen spielerischen ironischen Grimsen (weit offene Auge vorn, Kinn leicht angezogen, flaches Lächeln verschmiert übers angenehme teigige Gesicht) alsbaldig ihrer in süßer Freundschaft gefesselten beruflichen Einsatz anerkennt — ihr helfen würde:
Da dies so ist, runzelt momentan der junge aufrechte Geschäftsmann die Lippe, senkt dann den Kopf, und hebt ihn wieder um erst die prachtvolle mit eisernen römischen Ziffern versehenen Uhr und dann die gewölbten Decke und sein handbemaltes Gebälk unaufmerksam zu studieren.

Copyright: Andrew Watson of Watson Schmatson Lane

Der neue Advokat: Analysis

Der neue Advokat: Analysis

Der Plot:

Ein Advokat diskutiert den Dr. Bucephalus, ein junger Advokat und neues Mitglied der Rechtsanwaltskammer, der in einem früheren Leben Streitroß Alexanders von Mazedonien war.

Charaktere:
Der Erzähler: Ein Advokat, der sich fachmännisch und ein bisschen eitel benimmt (wenigstens scheint er den Gerichtsdiener als minderwertig zu bewerten), der aber auch in seiner Handlung des Bucephalus als tolerant, rational, und im Besitz einen spürbaren künstlerischen und historischen Sinn wirkt. Seine Redensart ist zwar trocken, aber er beschreibt der Unersetztlichkeiten Alexanders von Mazedonien sehr schön.

Dr Bucephalus, ein Advokat, der wie ein Streitroß die Stufen der Freitreppe der Gerichtsgebäude besteigt, der aber normalerweise seinem früheren Leben als Streitroß Alexanders von Mazedonien nicht gleicht, und meistens seine alten Gesetzbüchern widmet.

Ein Gerichtsdiener, den—wahrscheinlich schon seiner Stellung wegen—der Erzähler als “ganz einfach” beschreibt. Er bestaunt wie Bucephalus die Freitreppe steigt—es ist aber nicht klar ob er wirklich Bucephalus mit “dem Fachblick des kleinen Stammgastes der Wettrennen” bewundert, oder nur mit einer Wertschätzung der Schönheit.

Die anderen Mitglieder der Anwaltschaft: Wir lernen nur, daß sie auch dem Dr Bucephalus verständnisvoll entgegenkommen.

Warum die Geschichte so komisch wirkt:

Der Erzähler und die andere Mitglieder der Anwaltskammer scheinen nichts komisches daran zu bemerken, daß der Dr Bucephalus die Reinkarnation des Streitroß Alexanders von Mazedonien sein sollte. Alle scheinen diese Umständen—die in unserer Weltanschauung als unmöglich gelten (auch wenn ein Mann die Reinkarnation eines Streitroßes sein könnte, wie könnte irgendjemand—geschweige denn jedermann—diese Tatsache zweifelsfrei Bescheid wissen?)—als ganz selbstverständlich hinzunehmen.

Der Erzähler und seine Kollegen konzentrieren nicht daran, ob Dr. Bucephalus vor etlichen tausenden Jahren der Streitroß Alexanders von Mazedonien hätte sein sein, sondern beschränken ihre Überlegungen daran, welche Wirkung sein ehemaliges Leben darauf haben sollte, wie ihn das Barreau handelt. Also erleben wir eine fremde Weltordnung und Realität.

Man wäre vielleicht daher verleitet, die Geschichte als psychologisch Sciencefiction zu beschreiben. Vielleicht ist es nur ein Versagen unserer Wissenschaft, daß wir nicht feststellen können, wer eine Reinkarnation von wem ist; aber das Gefühl der Geschichte ist eher magisch als zukunftwissentschaftlichisch (wie wir über sein ehemaliges Leben wissen ist nicht erklärt—ist einfach akzeptiert, als ob so eine Kenntnis ganz in Ordnung wäre); und eher einfach anders als magisch (die Geschichte spricht nicht vom Zauberei). Immerhin, die Geschichte ist mit der Sciencefiction verwandt: wie die Sciencefiction imaginären Realitäten konstruktiert, worin man wissenschaftliche, philosophisches, psychologische, und gesellschaftliche Ideen untersuchen kann, baut diese Geschichte eine andere Realität und erforscht, wie die Gesellschaft Kafkas Zeit dazu reagieren würde.

Ist diese Analysis richtig? Ein bisschen. Aber wenn man annimmt, daß alles in dieser Geschichte, von der allgemeinen Kenntnis von Reinkarnation, genau wie die Realität Kafkas Prague sein sollte, klingt die Narration als unrealistisch.

Was wir von dem Erzähler nicht wissen ist, ist wie viel er unser Sinn der Ironie teilt. Die begeisterte Vergleichung des Bucephalus bestaunenden Gerichtsdieners mit einem Pferdekenner; die Begeisterung der “Einsicht” der Rechtsanwaltskammer dem Bucephalus gegenüber; die Beschreibung der mörderisch-ehrgeizigen Einzelheiten Alexanders Handlung (wie zB, die Geschicklichkeit, mit der Lanze über den Bankettisch hinweg den Freund zu treffen) als immer noch gegenwärtig, die Fähigkeit Indien überhaupt zu finden aber als seiner Zeitgenossen völlig unmöglich; die Zustimmung Bucephalus Entscheidung den alten Büchern zu widmen: Die Leser empfindet jede dieser Formulierungen als ironisch; wie aber empfindet sie des Erzählers?

Also kann die Seltsamkeit des Erzählers nicht einfach seine Kenntnis der Reinkarnation zuzuschreiben. Das Thema scheint er sehr ernst und selbstverständlich zu nehmen, aber er schreibt voller Ironie, Witz und Kunstfertigkeit. Sicherlich verstand Kafka das Witz seiner Geschichte, aber ein Teil davon, was die Geschichte witzig und interessant macht, ist der Sinn, daß der Erzähler es alles ganz im Ernst meint.
Was tut hier Kafka? Macht er sich über die ahnungslose Arroganz des Kleinbürgertums lustig? Über seine Bereitschaft, alles unkritisch hinzunehmen? Ein bisschen. Aber mehr spielt er mit unserer Sicherheit von der Realität unserer Realität. Auch zeigt er wie die Seele des Menschens von der Schönheit strotzt. In dieser erkennbaren aber zugleich verfremdeten Version unser Weltanschauung und Verhaltensstandards, blicken wir wie unglaublich auch unsere alltäglichsten Erlebnissen sind, und auch wie wir die Schönheit des Mysteriums des Lebens—egal wie oberflächlich wir zu sein versuchen—tief hinein bemerken und spiegeln muss.

AMW/BW

Kafka Translations 2: Der neue Advocat./The new Lawyer.

Kafka Translations 2: Der neue Advocat./The new Lawyer.

Note on this translation project:

The idea is to aid with German comprehension: First you read the German with the hard words explained; then you read an English translation; and finally you read the original German with perfect comprehension, as if you were Franz Kafka himself!

These short short stories were all part of the story collection “Ein Landartz” (“A Country Doctor”), published in 1919 (Franz Kafka, author; Kurt Wolff, publisher).

German original available (kostenlos, natuerlich) at Project Gutenberg (or at the very bottom of this page). If, deutschlos, you just want to read my English translation, skip to English Translation

I’ve also written an Analysis and Response Story

Der neue Advocat./The new Lawyer.

1. Wir haben einen neuen Advokaten [lawyer], den Dr. Bucephalus. In seinem Äußern [appearance] erinnert [to remind] wenig [little] an die Zeit, da er noch [still/yet] Streitroß [war horse] Alexanders [genitiv (possessive) case)] von Macedonien war. Wer allerdings [however] mit den Umständen [circumstances] vertraut [to trust] ist, bemerkt [notices] einiges [some OR quite a bit].

1. We have a new lawyer, Dr. Bucephalus. Little in his appearance reminds one of the time he was yet the war horse of Alexander from Macedonia {Alexander the Great}. However, one who is familiar with the circumstances notices a few things.

1. Wir haben einen neuen Advokaten, den Dr. Bucephalus. In seinem Äußern erinnert wenig an die Zeit, da er noch Streitroß Alexanders von Macedonien war. Wer allerdings mit den Umständen vertraut ist, bemerkt einiges.

2. Doch sah ich letzthin [lately, recently] auf der Freitreppe [outside steps] selbst [even Or alone Or myself] einen ganz einfältigen [simple Or simple-minded] Gerichtsdiener [court usher] mit dem Fachblick [expert-look] des kleinen Stammgastes [regular] der Wettrennen [race] den Advokaten bestaunen [to marvel], als dieser [as a pronoun, “dieser” can mean “this one” Or “he” Or “the former”], hoch die Schenkel [thighs] hebend [heben: to raise], mit auf dem Marmor [marble] aufklingendem[ring] Schritt [footstep] von Stufe [step] zu Stufe stieg [climbed].

2. Why, just recently I witnessed a simpleton court usher marvel with the expert eye of a small-time race aficionado as the new lawyer, thighs lifting high, shoes ringing the marble, climbed from step to step.

2. Doch sah ich letzthin auf der Freitreppe selbst einen ganz einfältigen Gerichtsdiener mit dem Fachblick des kleinen Stammgastes der Wettrennen den Advokaten bestaunen, als dieser, hoch die Schenkel hebend, mit auf dem Marmor aufklingendem Schritt von Stufe zu Stufe stieg.

3. Im allgemeinen [general] billigt [sanction Or approve] das Barreau [french: the bar] die Aufnahme [inclusion Or acceptance] des Bucephalus. Mit erstaunlicher [surprising Or amazing] Einsicht [insight Or understanding] sagt man sich [one says to oneself], daß Bucephalus bei der heutigen Gesellschaftsordnung [social order] in einer schwierigen [difficult] Lage [situation] ist und daß er deshalb, sowie [as well as] auch wegen seiner weltgeschichtlichen [world-historical] Bedeutung [importance], jedenfalls [at least] Entgegenkommen [goodwill Or obligingness Or accomodation] verdient [earned].

3. In general the bar approves Bucephalus’s membership. With astonishing understanding, one says to oneself that Buchephalus is, given today’s social order, in a difficult situation, and that because of that, as well as his world-historical import, he deserves at the least our courtesy.

3. Im allgemeinen billigt das Barreau die Aufnahme des Bucephalus. Mit erstaunlicher Einsicht sagt man sich, daß Bucephalus bei der heutigen Gesellschaftsordnung in einer schwierigen Lage ist und daß er deshalb, sowie auch wegen seiner weltgeschichtlichen Bedeutung, jedenfalls Entgegenkommen verdient.

4. Heute – das kann niemand leugnen [deny] – gibt es keinen großen Alexander. Zu morden [murder, kill] verstehen [understand] zwar [certainly] manche [some]; auch an der Geschicklichkeit [skill], mit der Lanze [lance Or spear] über den Bankettisch [banquet-table] hinweg [over Or across] den Freund zu treffen [hit], fehlt [lacks] es nicht; und vielen [to many (“to”: NOT “too”; this is dative) ist Macedonien zu eng [tight Or narrow], so daß sie Philipp, den Vater, verfluchen [curse] – aber niemand, niemand kann nach Indien führen [lead].

4. Today–no one can deny it–there is no great Alexander. To be sure, some understand how to murder; and the skill to spear one’s friend over a banquet table is likewise not lacking, and for many Macedonia is too cramped, so that they curse Philip, their father,–but no one, no one, can lead into India.

4. Heute – das kann niemand leugnen – gibt es keinen großen Alexander. Zu morden verstehen zwar manche; auch an der Geschicklichkeit, mit der Lanze über den Bankettisch hinweg den Freund zu treffen, fehlt es nicht; und vielen ist Macedonien zu eng, so daß sie Philipp, den Vater, verfluchen – aber niemand, niemand kann nach Indien führen.

5. Schon damals [in those days] waren Indiens Tore [gates] unerreichbar [unreachable], aber ihre Richtung [direction] war durch das Königsschwert [kings-sword] bezeichnet [mark]. Heute sind die Tore ganz anderswohin [elsewhere] und weiter und höher vertragen [to tolerate Or to take] ; niemand zeigt die Richtung [direction]; viele halten [hold] Schwerter [swords], aber nur, um mit ihnen zu fuchteln [brandish]; und der Blick [look], der ihnen folgen [follow] will, verwirrt sich [becomes muddled].

5. Even in those days, India’s gates were out of reach, but their direction was indicated by the king’s sword. Today the gates are utterly elsewhere, carried off further and higher; no one shows the way; many hold swords, but only to brandish them about; and the gaze that would follow them gets muddled.
5. Schon damals waren Indiens Tore unerreichbar, aber ihre Richtung war durch das Königsschwert bezeichnet. Heute sind die Tore ganz anderswohin und weiter und höher vertragen; niemand zeigt die Richtung; viele halten Schwerter, aber nur, um mit ihnen zu fuchteln; und der Blick, der ihnen folgen will, verwirrt sich.

6. Vielleicht [maybe] ist es deshalb [therefore] wirklich [really] das Beste [the best], sich, wie es Bucephalus getan hat, in die Gesetzbücher [law-books] zu versenken [sich~: immerse oneself into Or get absorbed by]. Frei [free], unbedrückt [bedrueckt: oppressed] die Seiten [sides] von den Lenden [loins] des Reiters [(of the) rider], bei stiller [quiet, still] Lampe [light], fern [far] dem Getöse [din] der Alexanderschlacht [Alexander-battle], liest [reads] und wendet [turn] er die Blätter [pages] unserer alten Bücher.

6. Maybe it is therefore really best to, like Bucephalus, lose oneself in old law books. Free, sides not pressed by a rider’s loins, by still and quiet lamp, far from the din of the Alexander battle, he reads and turns the pages of our old books.

6. Vielleicht ist es deshalb wirklich das Beste, sich, wie es Bucephalus getan hat, in die Gesetzbücher zu versenken. Frei, unbedrückt die Seiten von den Lenden des Reiters, bei stiller Lampe, fern dem Getöse der Alexanderschlacht, liest und wendet er die Blätter unserer alten Bücher.

Author: Franz Kafka
Translation Team: AMW & BW Translation Services, Ink(well)

English Translation

Der neue Advocat./The new Lawyer.

We have a new lawyer, Dr. Bucephalus. Little in his appearance reminds one of the time he was yet the war horse of Alexander from Macedonia {Alexander the Great}. However, one who is familiar with the circumstances notices a few things. Why, just recently I witnessed a simpleton court usher marvel with the expert eye of a small-time race aficionado as the new lawyer, thighs lifting high, shoes ringing the marble, climbed from step to step.

In general the bar approves Bucephalus’s membership. With astonishing understanding, one says to oneself that Buchephalus is, given today’s social order, in a difficult situation, and that because of that, as well as his world-historical import, he deserves at the least our courtesy. Today–no one can deny it–there is no great Alexander. To be sure, some understand how to murder; and the skill to spear one’s friend over a banquet table is likewise not lacking, and for many Macedonia is too cramped, so that they curse Philip, their father,–but no one, no one, can lead into India. Even in those days, India’s gates were out of reach, but their direction was indicated by the king’s sword. Today the gates are utterly elsewhere, carried off further and higher; no one shows the way; many hold swords, but only to brandish them about; and the gaze that would follow them gets muddled.

Maybe it is therefore really best to, like Bucephalus, lose oneself in old law books. Free, sides not pressed by a rider’s loins, by still and quiet lamp, far from the din of the Alexander battle, he reads and turns the pages of our old books.

Original:

Wir haben einen neuen Advokaten, den Dr. Bucephalus. In seinem Äußern erinnert wenig an die Zeit, da er noch Streitroß Alexanders von Macedonien war. Wer allerdings mit den Umständen vertraut ist, bemerkt einiges. Doch sah ich letzthin auf der Freitreppe selbst einen ganz einfältigen Gerichtsdiener mit dem Fachblick des kleinen Stammgastes der Wettrennen den Advokaten bestaunen, als dieser, hoch die Schenkel hebend, mit auf dem Marmor aufklingendem Schritt von Stufe zu Stufe stieg.

Im allgemeinen billigt das Barreau die Aufnahme des Bucephalus. Mit erstaunlicher Einsicht sagt man sich, daß Bucephalus bei der heutigen Gesellschaftsordnung in einer schwierigen Lage ist und daß er deshalb, sowie auch wegen seiner weltgeschichtlichen Bedeutung, jedenfalls Entgegenkommen verdient. Heute – das kann niemand leugnen – gibt es keinen großen Alexander. Zu morden verstehen zwar manche; auch an der Geschicklichkeit, mit der Lanze über den Bankettisch hinweg den Freund zu treffen, fehlt es nicht; und vielen ist Macedonien zu eng, so daß sie Philipp, den Vater, verfluchen – aber niemand, niemand kann nach Indien führen. Schon damals waren Indiens Tore unerreichbar, aber ihre Richtung war durch das Königsschwert bezeichnet. Heute sind die Tore ganz anderswohin und weiter und höher vertragen; niemand zeigt die Richtung; viele halten Schwerter, aber nur, um mit ihnen zu fuchteln; und der Blick, der ihnen folgen will, verwirrt sich.

Vielleicht ist es deshalb wirklich das Beste, sich, wie es Bucephalus getan hat, in die Gesetzbücher zu versenken. Frei, unbedrückt die Seiten von den Lenden des Reiters, bei stiller Lampe, fern dem Getöse der Alexanderschlacht, liest und wendet er die Blätter unserer alten Bücher.

A (Failed) Story of God’s Eternal Love

A (Failed) Story of God’s Eternal Love

The LORD God walked in the Garden, dreamy musculature in a thin white open-collar button-up, hands in grey tweed slacks, whistling an easy tune.
He hears a rustling in the sumptuous foliage and, craning his neck with a curious cockeye, discovers The Man hiding behind a mighty cedar tree.
So The LORD God said to The Man: “Hey! Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat?”
And The Man, long broad hand over his puny mortal genitalia, stepped forward into the golden sunshine filtering through great trees not seen on this world since the time of the Giants, saying, “Well, The Woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat.”
Then, from behind the shadeful cedar came a high-pitched, “Hey!” and out stepped The Woman, an arm across her ample breasts, a hand in the diamond center of her wide, world-populating hips. But, under a narrowing of The LORD God’s bewitching blue eyes and his steady-on “What is this that thou hast done?”, she lowered her eyes and, with a softer deeper voice said, “The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.”

Oh now they’ve done and gone it!
Might as well get matching “Shoot Me, Please!” target T-shirts.

And so The strong-jawed enchantingly-wry-mouthed LORD God of gleaming white teeth, beefcake hands on solid hips, doled out appropriate reprimands:
The tempter Snake should wriggle forever in the dust and an enmity should arise between him and the dupes, The Woman’s childbirth pains would have to be considerably increased and her free agency seriously curbed: “in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.” And for The Man: “Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, very specifically, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life; Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field; In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.”

But what is this strange aside?
And most strange of all: why let us in on it?
I mean this: Directly after sewing several cute matching outfits for occasions from formal to casual and sporty to labory–complete with coordinated footwear–, and directly before driving The Man out of Eden (letting his clingy baby doll follow after him) and placing at the east of the garden of Eden Cherubims and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life, The LORD God makes the following statement: “Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:” Therefore the LORD God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken.

Are we supposed to know how close we got to being a God? And who is this “us”? Wasn’t there supposed to just be the one God? Or is it that The LORD God is more like a demigod, and the one God too infinite and pre-body/mind to flaneur gardens? Was this an unguarded moment from The LORD God, or a calculated hint to keep us in the game through century upon century slogging through the mud and crumbling with the dust? I don’t think any of us could countenance the argument that The LORD God spoke to deceive us poor, already woefully uninformed mortal worms; No, that can’t be it!

Be that as it may, The Man started calling himself “Adam”, and he dubbed his chick “Eve”, because she was the mother of all living, and because in the witching hour, as the dark swallows every ambition and blind naked poking longing climbs forward, stripped of all but its most basic outlook, a certain vampishness can improve the mood and grease Necessity playfully along.

No, no luck.
Not a story of God’s eternal love, just a silly riff on the Tree of Knowledge story.

AMW/BW

Die Wale, Ein Sonderfall (Response Story to Kafka Translation #1)

Die Wale, Ein Sonderfall (Response Story to Kafka Translation #1)

Die Wale, ein Sonderfall

Vögel sind gefiederte Saurier. Sie vermissen ihre Verwandten, sind aber gleichzeitig ihrer Verschwindung erleichtert. So ist es wenn man wunderbare, schreckliche Verwandten verliert.

Menschen sind haarlose Affen. Wir vermissen nichts, weil enge Verwandten noch leben. Sie sind aber ganz enttäuschend: haarig, stinkend, und oft sogar gewalttätig und unmoralisch.

Für die Wale ist es aber ganz anders. Ihre engste Verwandten sind zwar nicht mehr hier auf der runden Erde, aber sie sind sowieso mit den Ausgereisten stets in engster Verbindung. Jeden Tag im Dunkel der Tiefsee sprechen träumende Wale mit dem weitentwickelnten Wasservolk, das vor zwanzigtausend Jahren die Erde verlassen haben.

Sie reisen durchs Weltall in Raumschiffe voller Seewasser, sehen wie Miniaturseekühen aus, sprechen eine singende walartige Sprache, haben seit Jahrtausend kein Geschlechtsverkehr gehabt, und bewegen Objekten mit der Energie ihrer außerordentlichen Gedanken.

Wenn du ein Walfisch wärest, träumtest du jede Nacht von kleinen pummeligen grauen Seemenschen, die die Erlebnissen deines Tages begierig belauschten. Und am Ende, gegen Morgen, füllten sie dir mit dem Wissen, daß den See einen wunderschönen Liebhaber sei, und daß du außerordentlich glücklich sei, dadurch schwimmen zu dürfen, und, weiter, daß du unbedingt die Gelegenheit ergreifen solle, immer wie weit und tief wie möglich zu erkunden. Dann wachtest du mit der vagen verwirrten Idee auf, daß du etwas besonderes weißt. Diese Idee würdest aber immer innerhalb wenige Sekunden zu trüb zu folgen werden. So teiltest du dein Leben dazwischen: auf der einen Seite, tierische Tage des Schwimmens, der Fütterung, des Kamps, und–wenn du Glück hättest–der schwimmenden Geselligkeit, manchmal sogar des nassen Geschlechtsverkehrs, und, auf der anderen Seite, Nächte der Aufklärung über die Macht des Geistes, die Erhabenheit und Vielfalt des Universums, und die Herrlichkeit des Sees.

Aber du bist doch kein Walfisch, sondern ein Menschen, und du und deine Affenverwandten seid einander gegenseitig verlegen. Es könnte aber schlechter sein: du könntest ein Vögel sein, und ständig in betrauender und schuldiger Einsamkeit zu Grunde gehen.

AMW/BW

This was written as a response to “Die Sorge des Hausvaters”. What do they have in common? Um, they both discuss mythical creatures and cultivate a silly weirdness.

Die Sorge des Hausvaters – Analysis

Die Sorge des Hausvaters – Analysis

Man muss die Sache Ernst nehmen: Sprachforscher haben den Name “Odradek” geforscht.

Man muss das Geheimnis bekennen: Sprachforschen können den Ursprung des Namens “Odradek” nicht entschlüsseln.

Man muss bestaunen: Ein kleiner zwirnbedeckte Stern, der wie auf zwei Beinen aufrecht stehen kann.
Man muss bemitleiden: Er ist eine chaotische Mischung aus abgerissenen, alten, aneinander geknoteten, aber auch ineinander verfilzten Zwirnstücken von verschiedenster Art und Farbe.

Man muss aber auch respektieren: Auch wenn am ersten Blick man versucht wäre, Odradek als gebrochen zu verstehen, sieht man dass er doch abgeschlossen ist–dass er eigentlich ein Etwas das man nicht imstande zu verstehen ist, und dass man weder fangen noch überleben noch immer zum Sprechen bringen kann.
Man muss schmelzen: Er ist so winzig und unbefangen einfach, dass man ihn als Kind zu behandeln versucht ist.

Man muss schon wieder staunen: Warum soll ein Odradek unsterblich uns Menschen kichernd beobachten?
Und wie wirkt das Ganze? Surreal. Einsam. Unglaublich. Verwirrend. Odradek existiert zwar nicht, aber das Leben liegt uns doch nahe, ungreifbar, und überlegen–wie Odradek.

BW/AMW

Kafka Translations 1: Die Sorge des Hausvaters / The Worries of a Family Man

Kafka Translations 1: Die Sorge des Hausvaters / The Worries of a Family Man

Note on this translation project:

The idea is to aid with German comprehension: First you read the German with the hard words explained; then you read an English translation; and finally you read the original German with perfect comprehension, as if you were Franz Kafka himself!

These short short stories were all part of the story collection “Ein Landartz” (“A Country Doctor”), published in 1919 (Franz Kafka, author; Kurt Wolff, publisher).

German original available (kostenlos, natuerlich) at Project Gutenberg (or at the very bottom of this page). If, deutschlos, you just want to read my English translation, skip to English Translation

I’ve also written an Analysis and Response Story

Die Sorge des Hausvater’s / The Housefather’s Worry
Hausvater: Master of the house, or warden–like at a boarding school.
Or: Housefather, the spiritual head of a household

1. Die einen sagen, das Wort Odradek stamme aus [stammen (aus): come (from)] dem Slawischen und sie suchen [search] auf Grund [auf Grund von: on the strength of] dessen die Bildung [formation] des Wortes nachzuweisen [nachweisen: prove]. Andere wieder meinen, es stamme aus dem Deutschen, vom Slawischen sei es nur beeinflußt [influenced]. Die Unsicherheit [Sicherheit: certainty] beider Deutungen [interpretations] aber läßt wohl [probably, arguably] mit Recht darauf schließen, daß keine zutrifft [zutreffen: be applicable / correct], zumal [particularly as] man auch mit keiner von ihnen einen Sinn [sense, meaning] des Wortes finden kann.

1. Some say that the word Odradek comes from the slavic and on that basis they try to prove the {etymological} formation of the word. Others opine it comes from the German, is only influenced by the Slavic. But the uncertainty of both interpretations arguably justifies concluding that neither is correct, especially as one can’t find a meaning of the word with either one of the supposed explanations}.

1. Die einen sagen, das Wort Odradek stamme aus dem Slawischen und sie suchen auf Grund dessen die Bildung des Wortes nachzuweisen. Andere wieder meinen, es stamme aus dem Deutschen, vom Slawischen sei es nur beeinflußt. Die Unsicherheit beider Deutungen aber läßt wohl mit Recht darauf schließen, daß keine zutrifft, zumal man auch mit keiner von ihnen einen Sinn des Wortes finden kann.

2. Natürlich würde sich niemand mit solchen Studien [studies] beschäftigen [occupy], wenn es nicht wirklich ein Wesen [being] gäbe, das Odradek heißt. Es [neuter from of “it”] sieht zunächst [initially / at first] aus wie eine flache sternartige Zwirnspule [r Zwirn: twine, twist; e Spule: spool], und tatsächlich [actually] scheint [appears] es auch mit Zwirn bezogen [beziehen: to cover]; allerdings [however] dürften [konjunktiv II (subjunctive mood) of dürfen (“may” or “can”)] es nur abgerissene [ragged] , alte, aneinander geknotete [knoten: knot], aber auch ineinander verfitzte [verfitzt: tangled up] Zwirnstücke [pieces of twine] von verschiedenster [verschieden: different] Art [type] und Farbe sein.

2. Naturally no one would occupy themselves with such studies if there wasn’t really a being called Odradek. At first glance it looks like a flat, star-shaped spool of twine. And it actually appears to be covered with twine–although they must be only ragged old twine-scraps of the most different types and colors all knotted up and tangled into each other.

2. Natürlich würde sich niemand mit solchen Studien beschäftigen, wenn es nicht wirklich ein Wesen gäbe, das Odradek heißt. Es sieht zunächst aus wie eine flache sternartige Zwirnspule, und tatsächlich scheint es auch mit Zwirn bezogen; allerdings dürften es nur abgerissene, alte, aneinander geknotete, aber auch ineinander verfitzte Zwirnstücke von verschiedenster Art und Farbe sein.

3. Es ist aber nicht nur eine Spule [spool], sondern [but (in the contrasting sense of “rather”)] aus der Mitte des Sternes [star] kommt ein kleines Querstäbchen [quer: diagonally; r Stab: rod; chen: diminutive] hervor [out of] und an dieses Stäbchen fügt [joins] sich dann im rechten Winkel [rechter Winkel: right angle] noch eines. Mit Hilfe dieses letzteren [latter] Stäbchens auf der einen Seite [side], und einer der Ausstrahlungen [radiance / radiation / emanation] des Sternes auf der anderen Seite, kann das Ganze wie auf zwei Beinen [legs] aufrecht [upright] stehen [stand].

3. But it isn’t just a spool, for a tiny little diagonal rod comes out from the middle of the star, and then, joined at a right angle to this first tiny rod, there is yet another. With the help of this latter rod on the one side and one of the star’s points on the other side, the whole thing can stand upright as if on two legs.

3. Es ist aber nicht nur eine Spule, sondern aus der Mitte des Sternes kommt ein kleines Querstäbchen hervor und an dieses Stäbchen fügt sich dann im rechten Winkel noch eines. Mit Hilfe dieses letzteren Stäbchens auf der einen Seite, und einer der Ausstrahlungen des Sternes auf der anderen Seite, kann das Ganze wie auf zwei Beinen aufrecht stehen.

4. Man wäre versucht [tempted] zu glauben [believe], dieses Gebilde [structure] hätte früher irgendeine [some, any] zweckmäßige [functionable] Form gehabt und jetzt sei es nur zerbrochen [zerbrechen: break]. Dies scheint [seems] aber nicht der Fall [case] zu sein; wenigstens [at least] findet sich kein Anzeichen [sign] dafür; nirgends sind Ansätze [approaches; less common: edges] oder Bruchstellen [Bruch: break; Stellen: places, areas] zu sehen, die auf etwas Derartiges [of the kind] hinweisen [point to] würden; das Ganze erscheint [appear] zwar sinnlos [senseless], aber in seiner Art [way] abgeschlossen [completed, self-contained]. Näheres läßt sich übrigens [incidentally] nicht darüber sagen, da Odradek außerordentlich beweglich [movable] und nicht zu fangen [catch] ist.

4. One would be tempted to believe that this structure once had some practical form and now it’s just broken. However, this seems not the case, at least there’s not sign of it, nowhere are there any visible edges or fractures, which would confirm such an explanation; it’s true that the whole thing appears to be senseless but it is in its own way a whole. To say more is, as it happens, not possible, for Odradek is extraordinarily agile and not to be caught.

4. Man wäre versucht zu glauben, dieses Gebilde hätte früher irgendeine zweckmäßige Form gehabt und jetzt sei es nur zerbrochen. Dies scheint aber nicht der Fall zu sein; wenigstens findet sich kein Anzeichen dafür; nirgends sind Ansätze oder Bruchstellen zu sehen, die auf etwas Derartiges hinweisen würden; das Ganze erscheint zwar sinnlos, aber in seiner Art abgeschlossen. Näheres läßt sich übrigens nicht darüber sagen, da Odradek außerordentlich beweglich und nicht zu fangen ist.

5. Er hält sich [sich aufhalten: stay] abwechselnd [in alternation] auf dem Dachboden [attic], im Treppenhaus [staircase], auf den Gängen [corridors], im Flur [“hall” or “vestibule”] auf. Manchmal [sometimes] ist er monatelang [months-long] nicht zu sehen; da ist er wohl [probably] in andere Häuser übersiedelt [moved, relocated]; doch kehrt [zurueckkehren: return] er dann unweigerlich [unavoidably] wieder [again] in unser Haus zurück. Manchmal, wenn man aus der Tür tritt [steps] und er lehnt [sich lehnen : lean] gerade unten am Treppengeländer [das Geländer: railing], hat man Lust, ihn anzusprechen [speak to]. Natürlich stellt man an ihn keine schwierigen [difficult] Fragen [questions], sondern behandelt [handle] ihn—schon seine Winzigkeit [winzig: tiny] verführt [seduce] dazu—wie ein Kind.

5. He resides alternately in the attic, on the staircase, in the hallways or the vestibule. Sometimes he’s not seen for months; then he’s most likely relocated to other houses; but he inevitably returns to our house. Sometimes, when one steps out the door and he’s leaning on the railing directly underneath, one would like to address him. Naturally one doesn’t ask him any difficult questions, rather treats him—his tininess alone elicits this response—like a child.

5. Er hält sich abwechselnd auf dem Dachboden, im Treppenhaus, auf den Gängen, im Flur auf. Manchmal ist er monatelang nicht zu sehen; da ist er wohl in andere Häuser übersiedelt; doch kehrt er dann unweigerlich wieder in unser Haus zurück. Manchmal, wenn man aus der Tür tritt und er lehnt gerade unten am Treppengeländer, hat man Lust, ihn anzusprechen. Natürlich stellt man an ihn keine schwierigen Fragen, sondern behandelt ihn—schon seine Winzigkeit verführt dazu—wie ein Kind.

6. „Wie heißt du denn?« fragt man ihn. »Odradek,« sagt er. »Und wo wohnst du?« »Unbestimmter [unbestimmt: indefinite] Wohnsitz [(place of) residence],« sagt er und lacht [laughs]; es ist aber nur ein Lachen [laughter], wie man es ohne Lungen [lungs] hervorbringen [produce] kann. Es klingt [sounds] etwa [approximately] so, wie das Rascheln [rascheln: to rustle] in gefallenen Blättern [leaves]. Damit ist die Unterhaltung [conversation] meist zu Ende. Übrigens [incidentally] sind selbst diese Antworten [answers] nicht immer zu erhalten [obtain]; oft ist er lange stumm [silent], wie das Holz [wood], das er zu sein scheint.

6. „So, what’s your name?“ one asks him. “Odradek,” he says. “And where do you live?” “Indefinite residence,” he says and laughs; it is however a laugh like one can only produce without lungs. It sounds a little like the rustling of fallen leaves. With that the conversation is usually at an end. By the way, these answers are not always to be had; often he’s long silent like the wood he appears to be.

6. „Wie heißt du denn?« fragt man ihn. »Odradek,« sagt er. »Und wo wohnst du?« »Unbestimmter Wohnsitz,« sagt er und lacht; es ist aber nur ein Lachen, wie man es ohne Lungen hervorbringen kann. Es klingt etwa so, wie das Rascheln in gefallenen Blättern. Damit ist die Unterhaltung meist zu Ende. Übrigens sind selbst diese Antworten nicht immer zu erhalten; oft ist er lange stumm, wie das Holz, das er zu sein scheint.

7. Vergeblich [in vain] frage ich mich, was mit ihm geschehen wird. Kann er denn sterben [die]? Alles, was stirbt, hat vorher eine Art [type] Ziel [goal], eine Art Tätigkeit [activity, occupation] gehabt und daran hat es sich zerrieben [zerreiben: grind, crush]; das trifft bei Odradek nicht zu [zutreffen: to be applicable]. Sollte er also einstmals [once, formerly] etwa noch vor den Füßen meiner Kinder und Kindeskinder mit nachschleifendem [trailing] Zwirnsfaden [Zwirn: twine; r Faden: thread] die Treppe hinunterkollern [hinunter: down; kollern: roll]? Er schadet [harms] ja offenbar [evidently] niemandem; aber die Vorstellung [notion], daß er mich auch noch [auch noch: (in this instance) as yet (I think)] überleben [outlive] sollte, ist mir eine fast [almost] schmerzliche [painful].

7. In vain I ask myself what will happen to him. Can he die? Everything that dies had previously some kind of goal, some activity upon which it ground itself out; that doesn’t apply to Odradek. Will he then one day, twines trailing, roll down the steps at the feet of my children and my children’s children? He clearly harms no one; but the idea that he might outlive me is almost painful.

7. Vergeblich frage ich mich, was mit ihm geschehen wird. Kann er denn sterben? Alles, was stirbt, hat vorher eine Art Ziel, eine Art Tätigkeit gehabt und daran hat es sich zerrieben; das trifft bei Odradek nicht zu. Sollte er also einstmals etwa noch vor den Füßen meiner Kinder und Kindeskinder mit nachschleifendem Zwirnsfaden die Treppe hinunterkollern? Er schadet ja offenbar niemandem; aber die Vorstellung, daß er mich auch noch überleben sollte, ist mir eine fast schmerzliche.

English Translation

Die Sorge des Hausvater’s / The Housefather’s Worry
Hausvater: Master of the house, or warden–like at a boarding school.
Or: Housefather, the spiritual head of a household

Some say that the word Odradek comes from the slavic and on that basis they try to prove the {etymological} formation of the word. Others opine it comes from the German, is only influenced by the Slavic. But the uncertainty of both interpretations arguably justifies concluding that neither is correct, especially as one can’t find a meaning of the word with either one of the supposed explanations}.

Naturally no one would occupy themselves with such studies if there wasn’t really a being called Odradek. At first glance it looks like a flat, star-shaped spool of twine. And it actually appears to be covered with twine–although they must be only ragged old twine-scraps of the most different types and colors all knotted up and tangled into each other. But it isn’t just a spool, for a tiny little diagonal rod comes out from the middle of the star, and then, joined at a right angle to this first tiny rod, there is yet another. With the help of this latter rod on the one side and one of the star’s points on the other side, the whole thing can stand upright as if on two legs.

One would be tempted to believe that this structure once had some practical form and now it’s just broken. However, this seems not the case, at least there’s not sign of it, nowhere are there any visible edges or fractures, which would confirm such an explanation; it’s true that the whole thing appears to be senseless but it is in its own way a whole. To say more is, as it happens, not possible, for Odradek is extraordinarily agile and not to be caught.

He resides alternately in the attic, on the staircase, in the hallways or the vestibule. Sometimes he’s not seen for months; then he’s most likely relocated to other houses; but he inevitably returns to our house. Sometimes, when one steps out the door and he’s leaning on the railing directly underneath, one would like to address him. Naturally one doesn’t ask him any difficult questions, rather treats him—his tininess alone elicits this response—like a child.

In vain I ask myself what will happen to him. Can he die? Everything that dies had previously some kind of goal, some activity upon which it ground itself out; that doesn’t apply to Odradek. Will he then one day, twines trailing, roll down the steps at the feet of my children and my children’s children? He clearly harms no one; but the idea that he might outlive me is almost painful.

Story: Franz Kafka
Translation: AMW

Original:

Die Sorge des Hausvaters.

Die einen sagen, das Wort Odradek stamme aus dem Slawischen und sie suchen auf Grund dessen die Bildung des Wortes nachzuweisen. Andere wieder meinen, es stamme aus dem Deutschen, vom Slawischen sei es nur beeinflußt. Die Unsicherheit beider Deutungen aber läßt wohl mit Recht darauf schließen, daß keine zutrifft, zumal man auch mit keiner von ihnen einen Sinn des Wortes finden kann.

Natürlich würde sich niemand mit solchen Studien beschäftigen, wenn es nicht wirklich ein Wesen gäbe, das Odradek heißt. Es sieht zunächst aus wie eine flache sternartige Zwirnspule, und tatsächlich scheint es auch mit Zwirn bezogen; allerdings dürften es nur[97] abgerissene, alte, aneinander geknotete, aber auch ineinander verfitzte Zwirnstücke von verschiedenster Art und Farbe sein. Es ist aber nicht nur eine Spule, sondern aus der Mitte des Sternes kommt ein kleines Querstäbchen hervor und an dieses Stäbchen fügt sich dann im rechten Winkel noch eines. Mit Hilfe dieses letzteren Stäbchens auf der einen Seite, und einer der Ausstrahlungen des Sternes auf der anderen Seite, kann das Ganze wie auf zwei Beinen aufrecht stehen.

Man wäre versucht zu glauben, dieses Gebilde hätte früher irgendeine zweckmäßige Form gehabt und jetzt sei es nur zerbrochen. Dies scheint aber nicht der Fall zu sein; wenigstens findet sich kein Anzeichen dafür; nirgends sind Ansätze oder Bruchstellen zu sehen, die auf etwas Derartiges hinweisen würden; das Ganze erscheint zwar sinnlos, aber in seiner Art abgeschlossen. Näheres läßt sich übrigens nicht darüber sagen, da Odradek außerordentlich beweglich und nicht zu fangen ist.

Er hält sich abwechselnd auf dem Dachboden, im Treppenhaus, auf den Gängen, im Flur auf. Manchmal ist er monatelang nicht zu sehen; da ist er wohl in andere Häuser übersiedelt; doch kehrt er dann unweigerlich wieder in unser Haus zurück. Manchmal, wenn man aus der Tür tritt und er lehnt gerade unten am Treppengeländer, hat man Lust, ihn anzusprechen. Natürlich stellt man an ihn keine schwierigen Fragen, sondern behandelt ihn – schon seine Winzigkeit verführt[100] dazu – wie ein Kind. »Wie heißt du denn?« fragt man ihn. »Odradek,« sagt er. »Und wo wohnst du?« »Unbestimmter Wohnsitz,« sagt er und lacht; es ist aber nur ein Lachen, wie man es ohne Lungen hervorbringen kann. Es klingt etwa so, wie das Rascheln in gefallenen Blättern. Damit ist die Unterhaltung meist zu Ende. Übrigens sind selbst diese Antworten nicht immer zu erhalten; oft ist er lange stumm, wie das Holz, das er zu sein scheint.

Vergeblich frage ich mich, was mit ihm geschehen wird. Kann er denn sterben? Alles, was stirbt, hat vorher eine Art Ziel, eine Art Tätigkeit gehabt und daran hat es sich zerrieben; das trifft bei Odradek nicht zu. Sollte er also einstmals etwa noch vor den Füßen meiner Kinder und Kindeskinder mit nachschleifendem Zwirnsfaden die Treppe hinunterkollern? Er schadet ja offenbar niemandem; aber die Vorstellung, daß er mich auch noch überleben sollte, ist mir eine fast schmerzliche.